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Submission Tips

Submission Tip: Item Title Naming Convention (AudioJungle)  

by posted in Submission Tips
Oct 5
2011

Howdy talented authors! In an ongoing quest for transparency, we bring you another submission tip. These are regular juicy tidbits about our review process, and address issues that can trip up authors. This tip is aimed at AudioJungle authors, but may be relevant to authors in our other marketplaces.

Today we have a brief look at the item title naming convention.

Make sure your titles follow the AudioJungle titling protocol. This is found in the AudioJungle Marketplace Wiki. In summary, the Name field should always be relevant, concise, and professional looking. Here are some examples:

Good:

  • “This is the File Name” – Capitalize the first letter in each word. Small words like “of” and “an” may be lowercase.
  • “Template with CMS” – Do capitalize acronyms and abbreviations like XML and PSD.
  • “WordPress Template” – Do follow the industry standard even if it doesn’t follow the normal capitalization rules. For example, use jQuery and WordPress instead of Jquery and WordPress.

Bad:

  • “THIS IS NOT ACCEPTABLE” – Do not use all CAPS.
  • “this is also not acceptable” – Do not use all lowercase.
  • “Beautiful File” or “The Best Template” – Do not use subjective words like brilliant, amazing, or best. These words describe your opinion rather than what the file actually is.
  • “User9909 – File Name” – Do not append your username or any other less-relevant information to the file name.
  • “Apple-like Design” – Do not describe what your item is similar to in its title, describe what it actually is.

Chime in at the comments if you have any questions and thanks for reading!

Submission Tip: Adding the Preview Watermark (AudioJungle)  

by posted in Submission Tips
Oct 3
2011

Howdy talented authors! In an ongoing quest for transparency, we bring you another submission tip. These are regular juicy tidbits about our review process, and address issues that can trip up authors. This tip is aimed at AudioJungle authors, but may be relevant to authors in our other marketplaces.

Today we have a brief look at the preview watermark.

The preview watermark should always be clearly heard, but not too loud to overpower the music. It should also be heard every 10 seconds, and it must be heard in its original state, as it sounds when you download it. Any submissions with noticeable effects or changes to the the watermark will be rejected.

Chime in at the comments if you have any questions and thanks for reading!

Submission Tip: Become Familiar with the Upload Instructions (AudioJungle)  

by posted in Submission Tips
Sep 28
2011

Howdy talented authors! In an ongoing quest for transparency, we bring you another submission tip. These are regular juicy tidbits about our review process, and address issues that can trip up authors. This tip is aimed at AudioJungle authors, but may be relevant to authors in our other marketplaces.

Today we have a brief look at upload instructions.

If you are a new author, you should fully familiarize yourself with the uploading instructions of the section you are submitting to. If you are submitting an ident for example, choose idents in the upload dropdown, then press Help before pressing Upload to see the respective rules for that section.

Chime in at the comments if you have any questions and thanks for reading!

Getting Your File Approved on GraphicRiver – Part 2  

by posted in Submission Tips
Aug 31
2011

We’re excited to bring you Part Two of our tips and tricks for authors to Getting Your File Approved! If you haven’t already, be sure to check out Part One, where we covered common technical problems and rejections. This week, we’ll be looking at design and licensing issues! These tips come right from the hard-working team members who review your files, written by the fantastic bgm, Ben Gibbin. Lets pick up where we left off!

This post originally appeared on the GraphicRiver blog in 2009. Most of Ben’s points are still applicable today.

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Getting Your File Approved on GraphicRiver – Part 1  

by posted in Submission Tips
Aug 24
2011

As a reviewer on GraphicRiver, I’ve grown to know the Review Guidelines very well and reviewed more files than grains of sand on the beach. I’ve reviewed some truly awesome files and then, some that aren’t so good.

In the case of the latter, the files usually haven’t followed the guidelines. It’s absolutely imperative you follow them to the tee. And so, with that in mind we’ve decided to publish a helpful two-parter series on how to increase the likelihood of having your file approved to our wonderful marketplace.

This post originally appeared on the GraphicRiver blog in 2009. Most of Ben’s points are still applicable today, though there may be categories created since the article that are not covered here. Any dead links have been removed.

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VideoHive: Common Rejection Factors  

by posted in Submission Tips
Aug 20
2011

Before submitting your first file to VideoHive, consider the following factors, which frequently contribute to rejected submissions. Please note that this list should only be used only as a guideline.

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Submission Tip: Stricter Policy on Deprecated Tags and Functions  

by posted in Submission Tips
Jul 25
2011

Howdy talented authors! In this ongoing quest for more transparency, here I am, again, with more juicy tidbits about the reviewing process. Let’s look at some issues that we’ll most probably enforce down the road in the interest of keeping overall quality high in the marketplace. These aren’t stringently enforced, yet, but will be soon.

This time we look at a stricter policy on deprecated tags and functions.

As I mentioned earlier, our policy towards deprecated functions is a little bit lenient at the moment. We only dock an author if the tag being used is too old and has a completely better alternative. Moving forward, we’ll require authors to use only current functions and tags. Replacing bloginfo(parameter) with their more specialized alternatives should be a great first step towards this direction.

Chime in at the comments if you have any questions and thanks for reading!

Submission Tip: Demo Data  

by posted in Submission Tips
Jul 20
2011

Howdy talented authors! In this ongoing quest for more transparency, here I am, again, with more juicy tidbits about the reviewing process. Let’s look at some issues that we’ll most probably enforce down the road in the interest of keeping overall quality high in the marketplace. These aren’t stringently enforced, yet, but will be soon.

This time we look at demo data.

Theme authors whip up impressive looking demos to woo authors. In real life though, it’s hard for a novice user to replicate the demo, bit for bit. To alleviate issues like these, authors may be required to include some simple setup data to replicate the demo. A lot of authors seem to be doing this already.

Chime in at the comments if you have any questions and thanks for reading!

Submission Tip: Position of Theme’s Menu  

by posted in Submission Tips
Jul 18
2011

Howdy talented authors! In this ongoing quest for more transparency, here I am, again, with more juicy tidbits about the reviewing process. Let’s look at some issues that we’ll most probably enforce down the road in the interest of keeping overall quality high in the marketplace. These aren’t stringently enforced, yet, but will be soon.

This time we look at the position of the theme’s menu.

Most themes add a top level menu under WordPress. While this is great for visibility, a more intuitive place for it will be under the Appearance menu. This is inline with the official WordPress review process and will soon be enforced. Don’t worry, it’s often a matter using add_theme_page() instead of add_menu_page()

Chime in at the comments if you have any questions and thanks for reading!

Submission Tip: Licenses, Credits and Copyrights  

by posted in Submission Tips
Jul 13
2011

Howdy talented authors! In this ongoing quest for more transparency, here I am, again, with more juicy tidbits about the reviewing process. More specifically, I’d like to address some issues that seem to be tripping up a lot of authors. In the interest of brevity, I won’t go too much into the issues themselves since they’re a single search away.

This time we look at licenses, credits and copyrights.

I don’t think I need to explain what I’m talking about here. One of those small issues that authors seem to forget on a regular basis. Make sure that the license files are in place, give credit where credit is due [or required!] and double check the assets that you’re including with your template. The last thing you or I want is a DMCA takedown notice.

Chime in at the comments if you have any questions and thanks for reading!